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Heavy Cannabis Use Associated With Reduction in Activated and Inflammatory Immune Cell Frequencies in Antiretroviral Therapy-Treated Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals.

Abstract

Clin Infect Dis. 2018 Jun 1;66(12):1872-1882. doi: 10.1093/cid/cix1116. Heavy Cannabis Use Associated With Reduction in Activated and Inflammatory Immune Cell Frequencies in Antiretroviral Therapy-Treated Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Individuals. Manuzak JA1,2, Gott TM1,2, Kirkwood JS1, Coronado E1,2, Hensley-McBain T1,2, Miller C1,2, Cheu RK1,2, Collier AC3, Funderburg NT4, Martin JN5, Wu MC6, Isoherranen N1, Hunt PW7, Klatt NR1,2. Author information Abstract Background: Cannabis is a widely used drug in the United States, and the frequency of cannabis use in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected population is disproportionately high. Previous human and macaque studies suggest that cannabis may have an impact on plasma viral load; however, the relationship between cannabis use and HIV-associated systemic inflammation and immune activation has not been well defined. Methods: The impact of cannabis use on peripheral immune cell frequency, activation, and function was assessed in 198 HIV-infected, antiretroviral-treated individuals by flow cytometry. Individuals were categorized into heavy, medium, or occasional cannabis users or noncannabis users based on the amount of the cannabis metabolite 11-nor-carboxy-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH) detected in plasma by mass spectrometry. Results: Heavy cannabis users had decreased frequencies of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR+CD38+CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell frequencies, compared to frequencies of these cells in non-cannabis-using individuals. Heavy cannabis users had decreased frequencies of intermediate and nonclassical monocyte subsets, as well as decreased frequencies of interleukin 23- and tumor necrosis factor-α-producing antigen-presenting cells. Conclusions: While the clinical implications are unclear, our findings suggest that cannabis use is associated with a potentially beneficial reduction in systemic inflammation and immune activation in the context of antiretroviral-treated HIV infection.

Authors: Manuzak JA, Gott TM, Kirkwood JS, Coronado E, Hensley-McBain T, Miller C, Cheu RK, Collier AC, Funderburg NT, Martin JN, Wu MC, Isoherranen N, Hunt PW, Klatt NR.
Journal: Clin Infect Dis. 2018 Jun 1;66(12):1872-1882
Year: 2018
PubMed: Find in PubMed